Category Archives: Philanthropy 101

The “Do Good Institute” Of Bruce Levenson Shows The Need For On Campus Education

Education has seen a major evolution over recent years as increasing numbers of classes and courses are being offered in the Online environment, but Bruce Levenson‘s “Do Good Institute” is proving the opportunity to gain hands on experience on the University of Maryland campus is an important factor in educating the next generation of not for profit leaders. Established in 2010, the “Do Good Institute” has many goals, including bringing together members of the University of Maryland campus community to develop new programs that can benefit struggling aspects of the local community. See, https://www.benzinga.com/news/17/03/9165680/university-of-marylands-non-profit-initiative-is-changing-higher-education.

One of the most important aspects of the “Do Good Institute” has been its ability to bring students from across campus together in not for profit endeavors, not solely those working to achieve a major in philanthropic leadership. Bruce Levenson of the United Communications Group believes the need to attend classes on campus has been shown in the success of the work of the “Do Good Institute” in its Philanthropy 101 course that brings together students to disperse $10,000 worth of funding for good causes. Success is already being seen with graduates of the “Do Good Institute” such as Ben Simon, the founder of the Imperfect Produce not for profit group that is making an impact on the real world outside the borders of the University of Maryland campus.

Prior to the $850 million sale of the Atlanta Hawks NBA franchise Bruce Levenson was a major part of the work completed by the team for charitable and not for profit groups, including taking on important board positions with the I Have A Dream and Hoop Dreams foundations. Levenson also sought to make sure the youngest members of the NBA fan community were given an understanding of the issues surrounding the World War II Holocaust when the players visited the U.S. Holocaust Museum the Levenson family helped to fund.