Reality Shows Might Be Staged

Reality television is supposed to show contestants or competitors in real life situations. Granted those situations are supposed to be high stress and entertaining, which is why the popularity of the shows has grown leaps and bounds over the past decade. However, recent developments have put a somewhat unrealistic effect on series that are supposed to be filmed with real life people dealing with real life events.

According to the New York Post, several reality shows have come under fire for tampering. One popular cooking show former contestant even revealed that it was not uncommon for ingredients to be swapped out by staff of the show, and replacing salt with sugar can have disastrous effects. The revelations are really calling all the credibility of the shows into question.

The news is not exactly ground shaking to fans like Sergio Andrade Gutierrez, because reality television is all about ratings. Strong personalities or extremely unfortunate circumstances get viewers to tune in. If a show can accomplish the lofty goals of earning viewers, then a little tampering is probably viewed by producers as a good thing. It is hard to say if the latest revelation will impact any of the shows in a negative way, but it seems likely that a statement will be coming.

European Geysers Found to be Less Active

Geysers are one of nature’s many beautiful sights, but just how do they work, and what causes them to remain active? The answers to these questions are far from complete, but some recent discoveries could very well shine some light on these conundrums.

We remember the dramatic announcement in December 2013 by the Hubble telescope Operators that two steam plumes of water of 200 km height are rising from the southern hemisphere in Europe. Could it be that this mythical Jupiter’s moon Enceladus is as active (around Saturn) and geysers?

It is known that large amounts of water vapor are emitted from the moon Saturn because they feed a cold dense core of material coinciding with the Enceladus orbit.

The gas that slows the torus locally plasma electrons in the magnetosphere around Saturn, is therefore at a lower temperature at this location. The probes had flown over Europe in 2001, before joining Saturn in 2014 and dump the Huygens probe for a descent through Titan’s atmosphere where it finally landed January 14, 2005. You can read more about this in Lee Lovett’s book Peak House: Aspen, Colorado.